Computer Science Gene Golub Fellowship

Gene Golub (BS Math '53, MA Stats '54, PhD Math '59), creator of the singular value decomposition (SVD) algorithm. He was a cofounder of the Stanford computer science department, and served on the Stanford faculty beginning in 1962 through the time of his death in November of 2007. He was chairman of the department from 1981 to 1985. He was a member of both the National Academy of Science and the National Academy of Engineering. His founding of NA-Net and NA-Digest helped unify the worldwide numerical analysis community.
 
Golub is well known for creating algorithms and software that allowed researchers to run large engineering and scientific calculations effectively on computers. In 1964, he created an algorithm for computing what's known as the singular value decomposition, or SVD. The algorithm is used in a variety of applications, including search engines, signal processing and data analysis. It is sometimes called the "Swiss Army knife" of numerical computation for its versatility. A native of Chicago, Golub came to Illinois his senior year of college. In his final semester, he took a programming course in mathematics, where he learned how to program for the ILLIAC supercomputer.
 
His contributions to the engineering and computer science field were internationally recognized, having received 10 honorary degrees from institutions around the world. He co-authored 18 books and about 250 papers during his lifetime. In 1981, he was elected to the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He was elected into the National Academy of Engineering in 1990. Golub received the B. Bolzano Gold Medal for Merit in the Field of Mathematical Sciences in 1994. 
 
This fellowship was established because of Gene’s love for students and desire to support them throughout their journey at Illinois.

Recipients

2018-2019 Margaret Lawson
Vladimir Smirnov
Ping-Hsuan Tsai